Saturday, September 24, 2022

Episode 28: The First Lick Goes to Uncle Sam!

 

Soda Jerk Passes Ice Cream Between Two Soda Fountains,
19 Dec 1936. Alan Fisher, photographer


Welcome to the supplemental post for Episode 28 all about soda fountains during WWII! I talked all about the obsession Americans had with ice cream and how that turned into pains for running a soda fountain in wartime. For the recipes, I tried some patriotic ice cream sundae concoctions which were all so delicious!

Two women at a drug store enjoying ice cream sodas, 1940.

Go to this Atlas Obscura article HERE to see what I believe is the original photo inspiration behind the piece of art in the following Coke ad!
From the National Geographic Magazine, February 1944



From Collier’s Magazine, 12 May 1945


I love this image from a Dixie cup ad emphasizing the importance of hygiene and reducing germs in places like soda fountains by using disposable cups. They talk about how this was especially important in towns located near military bases to keep sickness of troops to a minimum. 
Dixie Cup ad
Life Magazine, 28 July 1941


I was able to source a couple original wartime-era soda fountain menus. I love seeing the crossed-out prices and references to the war. See if you can spot them!










The Cookbook Feature: Soda Fountain and Luncheonette Management by J. O. Dahl, 1945.



And then I tried several varieties of patriotic ice cream sundaes. Here are the various directions for making them and images of the ones I actually tried!

Black-Out Sundae
1) Sealtest version 1: Double mound of Sealtest Butter Scotch Royale ice cream, "blacked out" under thick fudge topping, smothered with shredded coconut.
One of Sealtest's versions of "Black-Out Sundae"


2) Sealtest version 2: Vanilla ice cream, a few generous dashes of chocolate syrup, a sprinkling of crunchy peanuts, and a topping of whipped cream. 
Another delicious Sealtest version of "Black-Out Sundae"


3) Frechtling's Sealtest version: Vanilla ice cream covered with a generous portion of chocolate syrup, marshmallow topping, and whole peanuts. 

4) Sminole-Maid version: Vanilla ice cream "blacked-out" under thick fudge topping.

5) Hinze's Black-Out Sundae: Chocolate ice cream entirely "blacked-out" under a taste-tempting fudge topping, topped with fresh pecans. 


General Douglas MacArthur Sundae

1) Vanilla ice cream, blueberry and strawberry sauce, toasted coconut, and whipped cream, and a small American flag

2) 2 scoops vanilla ice cream, a scoop of strawberry ice cream, topped with blueberry, fresh strawberry, crushed pineapple, smothered in whipped cream, fresh roasted pecans, nabiscoes, and a whole sweet cherry. 
I combined the two versions of the MacArthur Sundae
to make this glorious creation! (note the 48-star toothpick flag I made myself!)


"Hitler"/"Dead Hitler" Sundae

The only description I could find was that is was "half nuts"... Get it? lol
I made my version with repeating layers of hot fudge, peanuts and ice cream all the way up the glass. It literally was half nuts by the end! As I mention in the podcast, this satirical sundae is a good example of the 1940s sense of humor and how they dealt with political stress of the time. The name still makes me uncomfortable, even understanding this, and I just wanted to be clear about that!

Hitler Sundae
A horrible name for a delicious sundae

Miscellaneous - sundaes with possible wartime ties

1) Hawaiian Sundae - 2 dips strawberry ice cream, fresh crushed strawberries, bananas, topped with whipped cream and a charm doll (or ice cream served with fresh wedges of pineapple)

2) Russian Mint Sundae (no description could be found for what was in it)


As a bonus, I made this Root Beer Milk creation with 2% milk and root beer syrup. I just added root beer syrup to taste. It was quite delicious and could serve as a nice replacement for chocolate milk in a pinch!
Root Beer Milk



RESOURCES

Websites:

Rationing in WWII: How Some Restaurants Survived

The Chop Suey Sundae Isn’t What You Think It Is

Tales from the Life of a Bronx Soda Jerk

Sugar Allies: How Hershey and Coca-Cola Used Government Contracts and Sugar Exceptions to Elude Sugar Rationing Regulations

U.S. Food Trends Analyzed: Peanuts, Dried Milk,& Ice Cream (check out the section on WWII)

The Secret History of Food: How Ice Cream Became the Ultimate American Comfort Food

Why the U.S. Navy Once Had a Concrete Ice Cream Barge


Images:

Washington, D.C. Girl sitting alone in the Sea Grill, a bar and restaurant waiting for a pickup. "I come in here pretty often, sometimes alone, mostly with another girl, we drink beer, and talk, and of course we keep our eyes open--you'd be surprised at how often nice, lonesome soldiers ask Sue, the waitress, to introduce them to us" April 1943.

Soda Jerk Passes Ice Cream Between Two Soda Fountains, 19 Dec 1936. Alan Fisher, photographer



Books/Magazines:

Historical Studies of Wartime Problems

Wartime Dealer-Aid Programs: Manufacturers’ Programs to Maintain Retail Outlets, Charles H. Sevin. U.S. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. January 1944. 
or

The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, published by the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 1943.

Counter Freezer News, October 1944.

Life Magazine, 16 Aug 1943
Life Magazine, 28 July 1941
Life Magazine, 20 Nov 1944

National Geographic Magazine, February 1944

Collier’s Magazine, 12 May 1945


Thursday, July 21, 2022

Episode 27 - Dinner in the Diner

Dining Car
Teacher's Kit - Railroad Transportation (date unknown)
(from the kit I inherited from my Great-Grandpa Glenn Hazelrigg)

 

Episode 27 was all about wartime rationing aboard dining cars in WWII. We uncovered some really interesting details! Enjoy these supplemental images along with some great railroad-themed propaganda from the National Archives. You can find the recipe for Military Chocolate Ice Cream at the end of this post!

National Archives - citation below

National Archives - citation below

National Archives - citation below

National Archives - citation below

National Archives - citation below

National Archives - citation below



postcard of
Dining Car on Southern Pacific's "Shasta Daylight"


Southern Pacific wartime pamphlet


Dining car kitchen with three cooks hard at work.
From my great-grandpa's teacher's educational kit

Dining Car Kitchen
From my great-grandpa's City of Los Angeles booklet

National Archives - citation below

B&O Dining Car wartime menu

Southern Pacific wartime dining car menu


Below are two more wartime menus: one for Union Pacific and one for Pennsylvania Railroad

 





The Cookbook Feature was: Military Meals at Home Cook Book: 250 Recipes adapted for Home use from Recipes used by the Armed Forces edited by Ruth Berolzeimer and published by the Culinary Arts Institute, 1943. 


I made the Chocolate Ice Cream. I mentioned in the podcast that I made it using the method of melted chocolate, but it had been awhile since I made it. In hind sight I remembered that I actually used cocoa powder. If you opt for cocoa powder, I would mix it in at the beginning with the flour and sugar.   




RESOURCES

Websites:

Dinner in the Diner During the Golden Age of Rail Travel

Excerpts from the Passenger Train (1940)

"Southern Pacific's first African-American dining car steward: Metro Disposal Inc. honors Mr. Charles Johnson.." The Free Library. 2013 IMDiversity, Inc. 12 Jul. 2022 https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Southern+Pacific%27s+first+African-American+dining+car+steward%3a+Metro...-a0329607748

Uniformed dining car waiters on the Empire Builder, February 1947

Riding and Working on the Railroad

Pullman Museum Searchable Catalog

A History of Railroad Dining Cars (video) from the North Carolina Transportation Museum

Dining Cars Come Back, 1945 (British Pathé film - it’s got some great footage of their kitchen!)

Preparing Dinner in the Dining Car

Troop Kitchen Cars - Heart of Dixie Railroad Museum, Alabama

C&EI Troop Kitchen Car - Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum - Indiana


Books:

Dining by Rail: The History and Recipes of America's Golden Age of Railroad Cuisine
by James D. Porterfield

Dining on the B&O : recipes and sidelights from a bygone age by Thomas J. Greco

Food on the Rails: The Golden Era of Railroad Dining by Jeri Quinzio

Military Meals at Home Cook Book. Edited by Ruth Berolzeimer. Published by the Culinary Arts Institute, 1943.

City of Los Angeles booklet published courtesy of the Women's Travel Department, Union Pacific, date unknown. (approx. 1930s)

Teacher's Kit: Railroad Transportation, from the Eastern Railroad Presidents Conference Committee on Public Relations, date unknown. (approx. early 1940s) 

Images:

Uniformed dining car waiters on the Empire Builder, February 1947

Pinterest Board: Railroad Dining Car Waiters - there are some interesting images there, however, as is the nature of Pinterest, it’s hard to trace back where the images were grabbed from. It’s a good start for some research though!

We Have No Time to Lose - National Archives at College Park, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

On the Job

"Life-lines to victory! Keep'em rolling - The railroad are the backbone of offense"

Railroads Are Ready

United for Victory

Stop Pleasure Travel

Right Behind Him

Don’t Waste Transportation

War Traffic Must Come First

Saturday, May 21, 2022

Episode 26 - Three Cheers for Trailer Town!

Staged photo of a woman checking her cooking
pot inside a camper trailer. Date unknown.

Welcome to the supplemental post for Episode 26 of the Victory Kitchen Podcast! In this episode we talked about the housing plight of Americans before and during WWII and the cramped housing situations that they dealt with. This in turn affected many housewives and the way that they were able to cook. This included the use of two burner stoves, hot plates, portable ovens, and other small appliances.

Edgewater Park trailer camp near the Ford bomber plant.
Ypsilanti, Michigan. August 1941.

Guests of trailer park playing Chinese checkers outside their trailer home.
Sarasota trailer park, Sarasota, Florida.
January 1941. (Office of War Information)

Mr. and Mrs. Wicks. Mr. Wicks is employed at the
Ford bomber plant near Ypsilanti. They are from Flint, Michigan.
They share a tent and a trailer with another family and
single man in Edgewater Park near the bomber plant. August 1941.

Son of Mr. Nichols, defense worker from Cass City, Michigan now living
in a trailer at Edgewater Park near Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Mr. Nichols works in the Ford bomber plant. August 1941.

A big thank you to my good friend Kelsey Lonie for sharing this Maclean's article with me!

Maclean's Magazine June 1, 1943
(Canada)

This is being advertised as a comfy "home away from home" vacation get away, but the reality is that many people used camper trailers like this as temporary and semi-permanent housing during the war. 
Schult Camper Trailer ad
Life magazine
July 28, 1941


Trailer Town - Three Cheers
Woman's Home Companion
July 1942

This image is part of the article "Boom Town: San Diego"
Life magazine
July 28, 1941

I mentioned this article from the August 17, 1942 Life magazine about Detroit housing. The images are definitely worth taking a look at.

Life
August 17, 1942

Life
August 17, 1942





Oak Ridge, Tennessee 
A big thanks to Jesse Williams for his interview and for providing the following photographs.


One of the flat top Oak Ridge houses that was relocated to someone's 
land after being purchased from the government after the war.

Jesse was able to salvage the kitchen from this flat top that was being torn down

The kitchen inside the flat top housing unit



The following original photographs from Oak Ridge were taken by Ed Westcott, the only person allowed to have a camera inside the top secret city. See my resources below for a link to a page all about his work. A huge thank you to Jesse Williams for sharing these photos with me! Some of these, especially the ones of the trailers and trailer camps, are more difficult to find.


The Guest House (later called The Alexander Inn)
Photo by Ed Westcott

"Colored" hutment area, taken from Y-12 water tower 
looking North. Note that it says "temporary housing"
by Ed Westcott
1944

Gamble Valley Trailer Camp, 1945
Gamble Valley Super Market is in the foreground on the left
by Ed Westcott
 

Midtown Trailer Camp
by Ed Westcott

Trailer, 1945
by Ed Westcott

Trailer Interior Living Room, 1945
by Ed Westcott

Trailer Interior Bedroom & Kitchen, 1945
by Ed Westcott

Midtown Trailer Park Family
"Wm. B. Christopher" playing dominos
(notice the photo of the serviceman in the back)
by Ed Westcott


Cookbook Feature: 
Double-Quick Cooking for Part-Time Homemakers
by Ida Bailey Allen, 1943

The recipe I tried was the Cake Crumb Pudding. It can alternatively use cookie crumbs. I really enjoyed the cake version. You can use any cake. I used a wartime recipe for Creole Spice Cake which you can find on my account on Instagram. I think a wartime chocolate cake would lend itself really well to this recipe too. I served it along with some delicious British Devon custard (Ambrosia brand - imported). Any egg-based custard would taste great with this pudding dish. 

As noted in my episode, I recommend making this recipe using a wartime cake or cookie recipe. Modern cake and cookie recipes use far too much sugar and fats and using them for this pudding recipe would change the consistency and overall end result. 









RESOURCES

WEBSITES:

New York’s Dirty Little Secret: Apartment Kitchens

1940s Portable Oven

African American Hutments

Oak Ridge Alphabet Housing

Voices of the Manhattan Project: Kattie Strickland

The Photography of Ed Westcott

Sojourner Truth Project



BOOKS/MAGAZINES:

The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan

Woman’s Home Companion. July 1942.



Maclean's Magazine. June 1, 1943. 

Double-Quick Cooking for the Part-Time Homemaker by Ida Bailey Allen. M. Barrows & Company, New York. 1943.

Cooking Behind the Fence: Recipes and recollections from the Oak Ridge ‘43 Club. Oak Ridge Heritage & Preservation Association, 2013.

Suds in Your Eye by Mary Laswell, 1946. (This book has a great companion cookbook called One-Armed Cookery also by Mary Laswell.) 

A Tower of Steel by Josephine Lawrence, 1943.

Since You Went Away by Margaret Buell Wilder, 1944.

IMAGES:

Mr. and Mrs. Wicks. Mr. Wicks is employed at the Ford bomber plant near Ypsilanti. They are from Flint, Michigan. They share a tent and a trailer with another family and single man in Edgewater Park near the bomber plant. August 1941.

Son of Mr. Nichols, defense worker from Cass City, Michigan now living in a trailer at Edgewater Park near Ypsilanti, Michigan. Mr. Nichols works in the Ford bomber plant. August 1941.

Edgewater Park trailer camp near the Ford bomber plant. Ypsilanti, Michigan. August 1941.

Guests of trailer park playing Chinese checkers outside their trailer home. Sarasota trailer park, Sarasota, Florida. January 1941. (Office of War Information)

Episode 28: The First Lick Goes to Uncle Sam!

  Soda Jerk Passes Ice Cream Between Two Soda Fountains, 19 Dec 1936. Alan Fisher, photographer Welcome to the supplemental post for Episode...